Image Image Image Image Image Image Image Image Image

Nature Nurtures and Pavlova

November 18, 2015 | By | One Comment

Sarah Davison and Stephen Burgen Where from: Sarah – New Zealand
Stephen-  Montreal, Canada/England
Profession: Sarah: actress/ Singer / voice artist  Stephen: writer and journalist

PG1

PG2c
PG3

PG4

PG5

PG6

PG7

PG8

PG9

PG10 PG11

PG12

PG13

PG14

Recipes:
 
New Zealand Pavlova: 
 
Ingredients : 4 egg whites,( if they’re small up to 6 ) 1 and a half 
cups of sugar ( ideally caster sugar but ordinary sugar is fine ), 
one teaspoon of white vinegar, cornflour, vanilla essence and one 
tablespoon of cold water. 
 
  Preheat oven to 180º C (350 F).  
  Using an electric mixer, beat egg whites and sugar for 10 – 15 minutes or 
until thick and glossy. Add water and beat again. 
  Mix vinegar, vanilla and cornflour together in a small bowl, then add to the 
meringue. Beat on high speed for a further 5 minutes  
  Line an oven tray with baking paper. Draw a 22cm (about 9 inches) circle 
on the baking paper. Spread the pavlova to within 2cm (1 inch) of the edge of 
the circle, keeping the shape as round and even as possible. Smooth top 
surface. Place pavlova in preheated oven then immediately turn the 
temperature down to 100º C (210 F). Bake pavlova for 1 hour.  
  Turn off oven  and leave pavlova in the cooling oven until it is completely 
cool. Carefully lift pavlova onto a serving plate. Decorate with whipped 
cream, fresh berries 
 
Smoky, Roasted Red Peppers : 
NB : if you don’t have access to an open fire or a bbc  a gas flame from a 
stove is fine – expose them to a flame !  
Ingredients: 
As many peppers as there are people 
Garlic cloves, finely sliced 
Fresh or dried chillies 
Plenty of olive oil (extra virgin ) 
Handful of Capers 
Fresh basil 
Plastic bag 
 
Place peppers on hot coals or Barbie or on the gas burner directly. If you 
choose to put them directly on the flames watch them as they need to burn 
black all over so the skins can be removed easily but if you leave them too 
long you will burn the sweet pepper flesh as well. If you use a lower heat 
(smouldering embers ) it will take a bit longer but they will need less time to 
steam in the plastic bag afterwards. 
Once the peppers are well burned place them in a closed plastic bag so they 
steam and once cool take them out and peel them. This is messy and I prefer to 
do it outside. Remove seeds and black, charred skin and slice them into strips. 
Heat the garlic and chillies in a few tablespoons of olive oil and let them sizzle 
only for a moment. When they begin to colour turn off the heat and pour them 
over the peppers. Add capers and ripped basil leaves and serve. 
 
1: Do you cook together on a regular basis? Yes, most days. The 
usual pattern is Sarah does starters and puddings and Stephen the 
mains but this is sometimes reversed. In our house sitting down at 
the table with friends and our teenage sons is a daily ritual which 
has huge importance. 
2.What do you think is the influence cooking has had on your 
relationship over the years. We met at a 15-course meal in the 
house of friends in London 28 years ago and have been cooking 
and eating together ever since. Its incredibly important and 
probably one of the reasons we chose to live in Barcelona. We 
spend a lot of time thinking and talking about food, ingredients 
and planning menus. 
 
3: What are your main sources for recipes? Traditional Spanish and 
Catalan ingredients and dishes, the cookbooks from Moro, Claudia 
RodenOttolenghi, Martín BerasteguiCarme Ruscalleda and also 
Ferran Adrià’s book of the dishes the staff ate in el Bulli, plus The 
Edmonds Cookbook from New Zealand for baking. Often we just go 
down to Santa Caterina market and see what’s in season. 
 
4: Cooking has evolved from being a women’s chore to feed the 
family to something that both men and women enjoy and are 
passionate about.. what would you say has helped in the 
transition? Most of our friends place huge importance on food as a 
social focus point. In the Eighties in London people became 
increasingly aware of Mediterranean food and explored recipes 
from southern Europe. Among our social group we worked our way 
through France, Italy and Spain, acquiring a delicious education in 
the Mediterranean diet. We used to cook more French-style dishes 
in London but those reduced and cream-heavy sauces don’t make 
sense living here, though Stephen still goes back to Raymond 
Blanc from time to time during winter. Nearly everything we cook 
is Mediterranean, including North Africa and the Middle East, 
especially Morocco. One thing we miss about England is curry 
which we also cook ourselves as the curry in Barcelona is very 
poor. 
  
5: Can you tell us about the origins of the dishes you’ve prepared? 
The pavlova is a famous pudding from NZ and Australia. There has 
been a battle between NZ and Oz for years over the origins of this 
famous pudding. Nzers like to think its theirs and was named after 
a trip to the Antipodes by the famous  Russian balerina, Anna 
Pavlova . Its a bit like the paella in Spain in that everyone has 
their version but it has nothing in common with the hard, over 
sugared merengues of Spain. For us puddings are the one weak 
link in Spanish cuisine. We tire of crema catalana and egg 
puddings and flans and love the lightness of the pav with its 
seasonal fruits on top (Aussies usually put passion fruit on top
Kiwis (NZ strawberries, raspberries or kiwifruit )  
 
The roasted pepper salad is very typical of Spain and Catalunya
Its very simple and because of its smoky, barbecue flavour our 
sons eat it when other vegetables fail. Peppers appear in many 
dishes from Spain and the famous roasted piquillo peppers of the 
Basque country are unbeatable for sweetness and flavour. 
  
 
 
 

Comments

  1. Euge

    Hermosas fotos de la casita, hermosa familia y riquísimo pastel. Yo lo he probado!

Submit a Comment